Pantoloc

Brand Name:Pantoloc, PANTO IV

Prescription needed: Yes

What is this drug used for?

Pantoprazole is most commonly used to heal and treat the symptoms of a stomach condition called gastroeophageal reflux disease (GERD). In addition, it is commonly used alone or with other medications called antibiotics to heal and treat the symptoms of stomach or duodenal ulcers. It can also be used to treat problems of the stomach caused by too much acid.

Is there any reason not to take this drug?

You should not take this drug if you are allergic to pantoprazole or similar drugs such as esomeprazole, lansoprazole, omeprazole, or rabeprazole. Before taking this medication, tell your doctor specifically if you have or have ever had:
  • problems with your liver
  • a lab test or biopsy planned for H. pylori

What about possible side effects?

This medication is generally well tolerated. However, if you experience side effects, you may experience some of the following:

  • headache
  • upset stomach
  • diarrhea

Very rare and/or possibly severe side effects include:

  • skin rash or itching - contact your doctor if you notice any blistering, loosening, peeling or redness of skin
  • an increased chance for pneumonia (community acquired)
  • low vitamin B12 levels - this may happen after taking the medication for a long period of time, especially in older adults
  • swelling of the hands or feet may occur with the intravenous (IV) form of this medication

This is not a complete list of side effects. If you are concerned about these or other unusual symptoms while taking this medication, ask your doctor and/or pharmacist for more information and advice.

What if I am taking other drugs?

Always provide your doctor with a list of all other drugs you are taking (including over-the-counter medications and herbal/natural products) as they may interact with and/or may change the safety or effectiveness of either drug. Tell your doctor specifically if you are taking any of these drugs as he/she may need to make changes in your prescriptions and/or monitor you more closely:

  • atazanavir – may decrease the amount that can be absorbed
  • digoxin – may increase the amount that can be absorbed
  • ketoconazole or itraconzole - may decrease the amount that can be absorbed
  • some iron, calcium or zinc supplements - may decrease the amount that can be absorbed
  • warfarin - may see an increase in the INR but not likely to be significant.

This is not a complete list of drug interactions. Talk to your doctor or pharmacist for more information.

Other information:

Special instructions:

If you are taking the medication for heartburn or GERD, it is best to take it about 15-30 minutes before a meal. This may help the medication to work better.

If you are taking the medication once a day and you don’t see improvement in your symptoms after at most two weeks, talk to your doctor or pharmacist. Usually, taking the medication once a day is enough to get relief. However, some people may need to take it twice a day to get continuous relief.

Duration of therapy: How long you need to take this medication is different depending on the condition(s) for which it is being used. Talk to your doctor or pharmacist regarding how long you will need to take this medication.

Lab tests: If you are scheduled to have a test to look for bacteria called Helicobacter pylori, talk to your doctor or pharmacist about the best time to stop taking the medication before this test. If you are taking the medication at the time of the test, it could affect the results.

Drug interactions: Because this medication can decrease the amount of acid in the stomach, it may change how other medications can be absorbed into the body. Talk to your pharmacist as there may be things you can do to decrease the chance of this happening.

Children: Although the safety and effectiveness has not been established in those under the age of 18, it may need to be used in some situations where other medications are not working. Talk to your doctor or pharmacist as the dose(s) will need to be adjusted to the age and condition.

Seniors: May take this drug as prescribed. If taking over a long period of time, you may have a greater chance for low vitamin B12 levels.

Pregnant women: Although there is no evidence of risk, safety in pregnancy has not been established. Talk to your doctor.

Women who are nursing: Safety not fully established. Talk to your doctor.

People who drive or operate machinery: Should not be a problem.

Alcohol: Can increase the risk of stomach irritation and may decrease how well this medication can work.

Overdose: If you experience any unusual reaction, or if you seriously exceed the recommended dosage, call your doctor or 911.

Stopping the drug: If you are taking this medication for heartburn or GERD symptoms, talk to your doctor or pharmacist about how long this medication is required. Sometimes, the dose can be decreased or the medication can be stopped without any problems.

If you are taking this medication for a condition called esophagitis, do not stop taking this medication without talking to your doctor. For most cases, this medication needs to be taken life-long to work properly and decrease the chance of complications.

If you miss a dose: Take it as soon as you remember. If it is almost time for the next dose, skip that one and after that, resume your regular schedule.

Storage conditions: Closed container; cool, dry location away from excess moisture (not in the bathroom) and light; always out of reach of children.

Dietary precautions: Drinking too much cranberry juice at the same time as the medication may decrease how well it can work.